Francis Slay

Building Innovative Cities: Mayor's Symposium -
08:45 am 10/11/2019
Copper Ballroom, Tucson Convention Center

A panel of former mayors from around the country will “talk shop” about what it takes to build communities ready for the 21st century economy with a special emphasis on what works and what doesn’t when building Innovation Ecosystems. Facilitated by Mayor Rothschild.

Building Innovative Cities: Mayor's Spotlight Sessions -
10:45 am 10/11/2019
Copper Ballroom, Tucson Convention Center

An opportunity for smaller group discussions with the morning panelists. Topics will include: Developing a blueprint for strategic public/private partnerships; Practical solutions in leadership – thinking ahead while managing the day-to-day and the future of American mid-size metropolitan cities.

Francis G. Slay made history in 2013 by becoming the City of St. Louis' first mayor to be elected to a fourth, four-year term in office.
During his tenure, downtown St. Louis was revitalized with major projects including Busch
Stadium and adjacent Ballpark Village, renovations of the Old Post Office, Central Library and
Peabody Opera House. St. Louis experienced a more than 133 percent increase in population
while Slay was mayor.
Through public-private partnerships, the region became a hotbed of entrepreneurship under
Mayor Slay, especially for life science startups, including development of the Cortex Innovation
Community and the downtown T-REX incubator;
The City launched its first Sustainability Plan under Mayor Slay’s direction – roadmap for
creating an economically, socially and ecologically vibrant City for present and future
generations.
Mayor Slay lead St. Louis to become a more progressive city by implementing a citywide
recycling program, a smoking ban and extended workforce diversity goals. Both The Advocate
and the Human Rights Campaign rank St. Louis as a top LGBT-friendly community. The City also
put in place a Housing First plan that resulted in a reduction in the number of homeless people.
The Mayor’s program to reduce children’s exposure to dangerous lead paint won national
acclaim.