Robert Williams, Jr

Meeting the Need for Higher Education & Professional Development in Indian Country -
10:00 am 10/14/2019
Greenlee, Tucson Convention Center

The panelists will present a case study on how the Indigenous Governance Program (and a proposed School of Indigenous Governance and Development that is still in the planning phase) at the University of Arizona was created to address a growing need for education related to Indigenous governance best practices among tribal nations in the U.S. and Indigenous communities around the world. To date, our program has reached over 350 participants from over 30 Native nations on 6 continents.

Included in the presentation will be information and stories about how these programs have helped tribes to strengthen their governance, rebuild their nations, and demonstrate sovereignty in action. Panelists to include Professors and Students that are a part of the program.

Robert A. Williams, Jr. is the Regents Professor, the E. Thomas Sullivan Professor of Law and Faculty Co-Chair of the University of Arizona Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy Program. Professor Williams received his B.A. from Loyola College (1977) and his J.D. from Harvard Law School (1980). He was named the first Oneida Indian Nation Visiting Professor of Law at Harvard Law School (2003-2004), having previously served there as Bennet Boskey Distinguished Visiting Lecturer of Law. He is the author of The American Indian in Western Legal Thought: The Discourses of Conquest (1990), which received the Gustavus Meyers Human Rights Center Award as one of the outstanding books published in 1990 on the subject of prejudice in the United States. He has also written Linking Arms Together: American Indian Treaty Visions of Law and Peace, 1600-1800 (1997) and Like a Loaded Weapon: The Rehnquist Court, Indian Rights and the Legal History of Racism in America (2005). He is co-author of Federal Indian Law: Cases and Materials (6th ed., with David Getches, Charles Wilkinson, and Matthew Fletcher, 2011). His latest book is Savage Anxieties: The Invention of Western Civilization (Palgrave Macmillan 2012).

He has represented tribal groups and members before the Inter-American Court of Human Rights, the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, the United Nations Working Group on Indigenous Peoples, the United States Supreme Court, and the Supreme Court of Canada. Professor Williams served as Chief Justice for the Court of Appeals, Pascua Yaqui Indian Reservation, and as Justice for the Court of Appeals and trial judge pro tem for the Tohono O’odham Nation. He was named one of 2011’s “Heroes on the Hill” by Indian Country Today for his human rights advocacy work as Lead Counsel for the Hul’qumi’num Treaty Group of Canada before the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights. He lives and works in Tucson, Arizona.